Carolyn Covington

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Assistant ProfessorCovingtonCarolynPhoto
Hope for a Healthier World
hopeforahealthiernworld@gmail.com

Dr. Carolyn Covington is and established researcher with expertise in health disparities in heart disease and stroke prevention and health promotion in minority communities. Dr. Covington received a PhD in Medical Sociology and Social Inequality from Howard University in Washington, DC.  Her dissertation was titled “Correlates and Risk Factors Associated with Coronary Heart Disease and the Likelihood of Engaging in Selected Nutrition Health Promoting Behaviors among Women Using NHANES Data”.

For more than a decade, Dr. Covington has engaged in active research on the causes of obesity and heart disease and methods of prevention especially among minority communities. In addition to her research, she initiated a course program as well a DC Angels Program, both of them focused on community-based heart disease and stroke prevention intervention. A key aspect of the course program is a community outreach and education component which is designed to increase grassroots community awareness of heart disease and stroke warning signs, risk factors and prevention. Over the past several years, Dr Covington has organized and led a long series of seminars, workshops and lectures both on and off campus. These have been widely received by students, faculty and the community. In addition, Dr. Covington developed and implemented a community-based health disparities course which was open to all interested residents of predominantly minority communities in the District of Columbia.

Dr. Covington has a strong belief and passion for educating the community about heart disease and stroke health disparities, prevention and health promotion. She believes that the most effective response to the stroke and heart disease epidemic in minority communities is education and lifestyle changes, hence her desire to pursues that approach. She is currently engaged in research to develop culturally sensitive models for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension for African Americans.